Sunday, February 28, 2010

Kid Cam

Aaaaand action!

June is due to kid March 3rd, but that doesn't mean she'll actually kid on schedule. I'd like to make sure I'm there for the kidding, so I got this video baby monitor to use so I didn't have to get out of bed in the middle of the night.

I didn't want to buy a video baby monitor, because they're usually $100 and up. I put an ad on Craigslist to see if anyone had one I could borrow until after the kids are born. A lady about an hour away responded that she had one and I was welcome to borrow it! How nice is that? I mean, this lady didn't know me from Adam and she was willing to let me borrow her not-too-cheap baby monitor! This is just a reminder how people really are caring. Sometimes it's hard to see people that way, but I think deep down most people are genuinely good people.



So I played around with different views in the garagebarn, and I think I like this one. I do think that maybe at night I'll change the view so it's more focused on the dog kennel. I can close June in the kennel at night and have an upclose view of her. The video is in color, and it has sound, so I will be able to hear what's going on as well. I'm just tickled pink over this camera! I can put it right on my nightstand so I can just open my eyes and make sure everything is ok.

The reason I'm so nervous about missing June's kidding is because June has tested positive for CAE, or Caprine Arthritis Encephalitis. CAE is a virus goats get that can cause arthritis in animals, and possibly some neurological problems, though that's not as common as the arthritis. Does with CAE can also have udder problems, like hardness and lack of milk. CAE is actually more common than one might think. It's transferred to babies through their mother's milk. I want to be sure to catch June's babies before they nurse so I can bottle raise them. If she has any bucklings, I may let her raise them though. A goat can also get a false positive if she/he's been exposed to the virus but doesn't actually have it.

I was disappointed when I found out June had CAE because I really did not want to have to bottle any kids. I hated the thought of taking the kids away from June. After working on dairy farms, that's one thing I always hated. Sure, the animals eventually got over it, but you could tell the mommas hated losing their babies. I figure I'll bottle any doe kids June has, and I'll let her raise any buck kids, since bucks won't be passing along CAE through their non-existent milk.

There are no issues with humans drinking milk from a CAE+ doe, so June will still be able to provide milk for our family. She'll continue to be a productive member of the family until she's too arthritic to be bred (if that ever even happens), and then she can retire here. June's mom is an older doe, I think around 11 (?) and she seems perfectly healthy to me, so I'm hoping June won't have any problems either.

The way I see it, CAE is just a minor little glitch in a perfectly nice goat. I already got some cow colostrum from a dairy farm where I used to work, and I have a bag of milk replacer ready for the kids. Now all I need is kids! C'mon June!

7 comments:

Becky said...

That is an awesome camera! That was so nice of that lady to loan it to you. Did you give her a link to your blog so she can see it in action?

I really hope June has a buck and a doe so she can have one to raise. Would there be a chance that Purl could accept the kid as her own? or would she not make enough milk to support another baby?

I'm also very glad for you that the CAE doesn't prevent you from being able to drink the milk.

The Kid Watch 2010 begins!! :)

Dad said...

That's great Katie. It looks like you're all set. I agree with Becky and hope she has both a buck and a doe so she can raise a kid. A kid...get it? Love you.

Jennifer said...

Cool! That was very nice of the lady to let you borrow her baby monitor. Cant wait to see...

Anonymous said...

I'm not sure if you know about checking the doe's tailhead ligaments to see if she's going to deliver soon or not. Basically, every doe has two ligaments on either side of her tailhead that are very easy to feel. When they disappear, the doe will deliver within 12 hours. We've used this method for 4 years, and have freshened over fifty does. It's never failed for us.
Check out Fiasco Goat's article (with illustrations) about the ligaments at http://fiascofarm.com/goats/prenatalcare.html

Just thought you might be interested in trying this method out...

katiegirl said...

Hi Anon,

Yes, I do check her tail ligaments every day. So far they've been soft, then back again, then soft again, etc. I check them every time I go out to see her. :-) Thanks for commenting!

Deb said...

I am so sorry about June testing positive for CAE hon. She is such a special goat. I hope it doesn't affect her being able to be milked. I know it hurts you to think of her hurting at not being able to raise her babies. I wish I lived closer and could help with the bottle feedings. Hang in there hon. Love you, Momma

Anonymous said...

Hi! So glad to see all doing well! I am happy that the monitor was a help to you! Talk to you soon! Tiffany

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